Thursday, July 28, 2011

101 degrees with goat rescue #3

People I'm getting reasonably upset that our neighbors can leave a goat stuck in the fence all day. I heard it calling before 8am and this evening at 6:30pm I went down and freed it. These people must be inside running the AC (windows sealed tightly shut) and not paying attention to their animals. The weatherman said it made it up to 101 degrees (39c), it was 96 degrees when I freed the goat.  So what should we do about these neighbors? I hate to have neighbors mad at me, but there is something else I have not mentioned yet. There was a Turkey Vulture in a tree waiting for the goat to not be rescued.


Poor poor goat on a very hot day stuck in the fence all day.
After I rescued him the Billy came down to see if it was OK.
Here is the Turkey Vulture up in the tree above the goat.

The beehive was very active at 6:30 pm it was 96 degrees. This is an orientation flight, something bees do when they first decide to leave the hive to forage. The orientation flight helps them to get their bearings so they know how to return home. This is the busiest I have seen the hive, they were in mass in a 5 -6 ft area in flight all in front of the hive. Did I tell you I need to cut those weeds in front of the hive?

13 comments:

FabricandFlowers said...

I'm so glad that goat has you as a neighbor.

Janet, The Queen of Seaford said...

That poor goat. I can't believe they let that goat stay in the fence all day. Maybe a call to the Humane Society is in order. That vulture knows what is coming.....

Your bees are so interesting, I appreciate you posting updates.

Southern Lady said...

Poor goat. So glad that you freed it. It has been so hot, the poor little thing surely would have perished! Carla

NotSoAngryRedHead said...

Incredibly irresponsible to do that to a goat. They need water. They need to stretch and move. I can't imagine standing up all day in that weather without water. Sometimes a reminder helps in situations like this. Like, "Hey, your goat was stuck in the fence for more than 12 hours before I freed it. It was pretty hot, and the goat had no access to water. I'm not trying to cause trouble, and I'm sure you don't want to put your animals through this sort of thing. Please be more careful."

Ok, maybe not exactly like that, but if someone said that to me, I'd be embarrassed as hell and make sure to not do it again. Of course, there are incredibly irrational people out there, but generally, reminders and mild chastising do a bit of good.

Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

Being new to your blog, I cruised back several pages and saw the previous posts about this goat vs. fence thing. I guess goats are not that smart? They don't learn? What is so appealing on your side of the fence? Your grass is just as green, but it is longer. I've seen sheep ranches near home here where they have a finer mesh fencing on the lower half to prevent this from happening.

ann said...

A very lucky goat to have a kindly neighbor. I would have freed the goat then called the neighbors. Perhaps they just weren't aware, so they need to know that they need to do a better job of looking after their life stock. Next time, I'd call the authorities. Been hot here too. Looking for some relief. Bees seem to be doing well.

Karen said...

Oh no, not AGAIN. I was looking at those horns and thinking it must be rather difficult to extricate the goat from the fence, must take a lot of repositioning. I had a goat for the summer once (long story) and can personally attest to their curious nature and their willingness to get into trouble, after all, the grass is always greener on the other side--and if they get through the fence somehow, wow, can they eat, bar the doors to your garden!

I don't know what to do if you don't want trouble with the neighbors; they seem clueless and/or careless. Do you ever talk with them much? We've got a neighbor with a vicious dog who thinks he has the right to let the thing run loose. It came after me one day (and so far, three other neighbors I know of) and I luckily held him at bay by yelling like a crazy woman, but that won't work the next time. I called the owner and he laughed at me, 'Oh, well, at least he's earning his keep; bet you won't walk by anymore.'

The finer mesh fencing sounds like it would work, but that shouldn't have to be your responsibility. These stupid owners are more annoying than their livestock!

Thought of your rain totes this afternoon, we had three inches of rain in an hour.......the eavetroughs were running over, (then I thought of the rainchains, lol) bet the totes would have been full!

tina said...

Maybe you could put a 'rabbit' fencing alongside your side of the fence so the goats couldn't get their heads in those squares. That kind of fencing they used is not for goats that have horns like these I am sure. Very neat on the bees!

sweetbay said...

Did you tell the neighbor the goat was stuck all day? They need to run hot wire on the inside of the fence.

Bridget said...

Some people should be barred from keeping animals. Shameful!

Appalachian Lady said...

The next time it happens, report them to the SPCA or the local police. They will come out and talk to them. You don't want to get in a fight with your neighbors. But, I'm so glad you saved that goat. On a hot day, I don't see how it would survive.

My bees are really hanging out or bearding on the front of the hive. It has been too hot even for bees which like warm weather.

. . . Lisa and Robb . . . said...

Eeesh poor goat.

Les said...

Maybe your human neighbors should spend the better part of a hotter than normal summer day with their heads stuck in a fence, without water. Perhaps this will give them a better appreciation of what that goat has endured, and hopefully this will lead them to a solution.