Monday, February 08, 2010

Hairstreak Butterflies from Belize

Folks,

Getting to the really hard butterflies! These are hairstreak butterflies and there is so many to choose from in Central America. Note none of these butterflies are as big as a nickle.

I'll start first with a hairstreak that is considered rare by the books I have. No place we looked had  an actual live photo of it, just pinned specimens. This is one reason we do this!
The Ambrax Hairstreak, Strephonota ambrax In flight it displays a brilliant blue. We found it
next to the Xunantunich Mayan ruins in Belize!
 

Here is a tiny confusing Butler's Midistreak  also called the Crolinus Hairstreak good thing the scientific name is the same Tmolus crolinus  It was found along the trail at Cockscomb Jaguar Preserve in Belize. The flower reminds me of Heal all. Below is a photo of what it looks like from above, the photo indicated it is a female.
The Pale Ministreak, Ministrymon una these are considered rare too.  I found this little butterfly near the Belize Airport just before we had the depart Belize....

Here is another one with several common names. Some call it the Togarna Hairstreak and others call it the Chiapas Stripestreak, the scientific name is  Arawacus togarna. Roger showed me a killer photo of this and said I missed three of them. Later I took a walk further into Cockscomb Jaguar Preserve and found three of my own in three levels of wear, this was the freshest one I saw.

Here is another rare hairstreak, the field guide had only a pinned specimen photo! The Heraldica Hairstreak, Nicolaea heraldica

That is all the photos of the hairstreaks I saw. Roger got two more a Oppia Hairstreak, Thereus oppia and the Red-spotted Hairstreak, Tmolus echion echiolus below.

We suspected seeing the Dusky-blue Groundstreak several times but never got a good look at it, I have seen this in southern Texas many times.

Above is an Ceraunus Blue, Hemiargus ceraunus which is common in Florida and we saw it lots of places in Belize. The most common blue we saw in Belize was the Eastern-tailed Blue which is plentiful in my North Carolina backyard during the summer.

A tiny note from our garden. It looks like we have 2 yellow crocus ready to bloom, I'll check in the morning.

19 comments:

joey said...

Beautiful butterflies on parade ... love it! A joy to visit via Shady.

Carol said...

I love your blog book of butterflies Randy. Stunning photos! ... and to think you have the real thing no pinned portrait of Heraldica Hairstreak, Nicolaea heraldica!! Lovely Lovely collection of Hairstreaks! You must have felt like you were in heaven!

keewee said...

I just love butterflies. Even though I have plenty of flowers to attract them, I don't see many in my garden. I will have do do a little research to see what species we get here on Whidbey Island.

Michelle said...

More amazing photographs! I always love to come and see your butterflies. Your trip must have been so gratifying.

Catherine@AGardenerinProgress said...

You are so talented. These pictures are just amazing!

Skeeter said...

We have the Banded Hairstreak in our gardens. I have yet to spot a Satyr. Your photographs are wonderful. I can only wonder how many snaps you must take to get that perfect shot? Butterflies dont always pose for me as they are so busy fluttering away at my gardens....

The birds are wonderful as well. I watch the many birds we have at our feeders and find a happy day when a new guest arrives! We have not seen a new species in some time. So it was a joy to admire all your birds today!

The Flamingo contest was too funny! What a cleaver idea for a contest....

Noelle said...

I love the Togarna hairstreak and see where it got it's name. Your photos are just so beautiful.

Di said...

Randy, thank you for sharing more beautiful butterflies and from another part of the world.

Also, thank you for the wonderful "Butterflies of the Carolina & Virginias" CD for which I mentioned on my blog. An amazing and beautiful work! I am going to share this with our three grandchildren. Who knows, they may want to be Lepidopterist. ;)

sweet bay said...

Beautiful pictures Randy, those butterflies are exquisite.

Janean said...

awe-mazing!!!

Dirty Girl Gardening said...

so pretty... I have a giant cocoon in my garden, I can't wait to see what it turns into.

Country Mouse said...

Such delicate beauties! I see some of those hairstreak type butterflies in my area - I haven't zeroed in on them as yet. So much to learn about!
BTW our blog was tagged with an "Honest Scrap" award by Christine at Idora Design - I did the post for us mice and tagged you (and six others) in turn. Don't feel obligated - but have fun if you like.

Ginger said...

wow, more amazing photos! I know it must have been a thrilling experience for you!

Shady Gardener said...

Hairstreaks are such a cute little butterfly. Isn't it amazing to find so many varieties?? Thanks for sharing. :-)

Ali Iyoob said...

Amazing leps!

Grace Peterson said...

Hi Randy~~ We've got a few crocus getting ready to pop too. Your butterflies are so delicate and precious.

Thank you again for your gift. I've made mention of you on my blog. And wondering how the flamingo is doing now. :)

fairegarden said...

Oh thank you for doing this, Randy! How much better to have quality photos for ID of live butterflies than pinned ones! We have hairstreaks here, and I thought I was doing well to just ID them as hairstreaks. Thanks for the Pine warbler ID too. Much appreciated. :-)
Frances

compost in my shoe said...

Wow, I want to hang out in your garden. Looks like you are their favorite place to spend a sunny afternoon. Great photos!!!!

Jean said...

How lovely these all our. I think we get hairstreaks in the U.S., right? I'm not sure which kind but I read that the amsonia I planted last year is larval food for it. Would love to see one!